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Increase in searches for part-time and casual work as wage growth slows

There has been an increase in job searches for part-time and weekend work, as well as jobs requiring no experience, according to job site Indeed.

The company said the increase likely reflects the need for those normally on the outskirts of the job market, such as the long-term unemployed or younger people, to enter or rejoin the workforce due to the financial squeeze being felt from rising inflation.

The top job searches in Ireland related to visa sponsorship in health and elderly care, which Indeed said could largely be attributed to inward searches for these positions from abroad.

The latest figures from the Indeed Wage Tracker show a general slowdown in wage growth in Ireland to 4.4% in December, indicating that wage growth rates have fallen below their 2022 peaks and remain well below the current rate of inflation of 8.2%.

The sectors that saw the biggest advertised wage increases in 2022 were childcare, information design & documentation and IT operations & helpdesk.

“These trends clearly show that jobseekers are feeling the pinch right now as wage growth sits at roughly half of inflation rates,” said Jack Kennedy, economist at Indeed.

“Salary, benefits and job security are the main priorities for them when considering their career, however it’s possible we may see less frequent job hopping as people become wary of moving in an uncertain environment,” Mr Kennedy said.

According to a survey of 3,000 Irish jobseekers carried out by Indeed, increase in pay is the main motivator for job-switching this year, followed by a better benefits package, job security and remote working arrangements.

The jobseekers surveyed had mixed views on remote working with 21% planning to work fully remote, 30% planning to hybrid work and 40% planning to be on-site at their workplace full time.

Article Source: Increase in searches for part-time and casual work as wage growth slows – Brian O’Donovan – RTE

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